Contact us

How can we help you?

Speed Cowl

High-efficiency cowling system for all Pilatus PC-12

After analyzing the PC-12’s stock cowling, some areas of improvement were identified – specifically the ram air inlet and internal ducting. This analysis led to the design and manufacture of Speed Cowl™. The cutting-edge design combines a cowl inlet which maximizes the recovery of high-velocity ram air and internal ducting that is aerodynamic minimizing air separation and flow losses of the high-velocity air to the engine’s plenum. This results in higher available torque at the same ITT settings, which significantly improves the performance of the Pratt & Whitney PT6A-67 turbine engine.

Speed Cowl™ has been flight tested in multiple flight configurations – climb, cruise at various altitudes, descent, with the inertial separator door open and closed – all at varied torque and ITT settings. During flight tests, under standard conditions, the cruise true airspeed was shown to increase approximately 10 knots in the flight levels. Also, time to climb above FL180 was noticeably reduced due to the available torque increase. Performance improvements will depend on altitude, outside air temperature, and ITT settings.

Let’s talk performance

Ram air recovery percentage is the ratio of the measured static pressure around the engine’s plenum compared to the dynamic pressure of the aircraft’s velocity through the air. Higher ram air recovery percentage results in optimum engine performance.

  • Improved Take-Off Performance
  • Quicker Climb: 250-400 ft/min
  • Faster Cruise: +10 kts
  • Reduced Fuel Flow
  • Increased Range

Internal aerodynamic design

Internal Aerodynamic Design is a key factor in achieving optimal engine performance. The aerodynamic efficiency of the cowl inlet and ducting are measured on how well dynamic air pressure, created by the aircraft’s velocity through the air, is captured at the cowl inlet and converted into static pressure around the engine’s plenum. This static pressure is generally expressed as a percentage of what is known as ram air recovery. For instance, 100% ram air recovery would indicate that 100% of the dynamic air pressure is captured by cowl inlet and 100% of that is converted to static pressure at the engine’s plenum. The higher the ram recovery percentage, the better the engine will perform.

At a given interstage turbine temperature (ITT), there is a finite amount of energy that can be produced by a turboprop engine. This energy is shared by the two power absorbing sections of the engine – the compressor section, which compresses air for combustion, and the power section, which turns the propeller. By increasing the ram air recovery to the engine’s plenum, less energy is used by the compressor section leaving more energy to drive the propeller.

The facts

Testimonial #1

“We performed two independent tests, one with standard cowl and one with the new Speed Cowl™. Take off power authority is impressive! The performance increase during climb was immediately noticeable with between 250-400 ft per minute. Improvements of TAS by 10 knots at cruise altitude at normal and max performance cruise settings.”

– Jon L. flying N124R

Testimonial #2

“We performed two flights, one with standard cowl and one with the Speed Cowl. My impressions are as follows:

Climb: noticeably improved. In fact, I’d say around 40% in most mid altitudes. We shaved several minutes off the climb to 300 with the Speed Cowl still pulling over 700 fpm at 29,500 compared to less than 500 on the stock cowl. We made 300 in just over 20 minutes with the Speed Cowl and about 24 minutes with the stock cowl. Interestingly, at 260 the Speed Cowl was still climbing at 1,000-1,100 fpm vs. 700 on the stock cowl. Time to climb to 260 was less than 15 minutes with the Speed Cowl and just over 17 minutes with stock. Also, the critical ITT transition altitude is increased several thousand feet from around 15,000 to about 210.

Cruise: there is definitely an increase in cruise speed but the gain varies by altitude and variance in air temperature. My generalization would be about a 7-8 knot TAS gain in most scenarios. We used 780 degrees as a baseline for both cowls to gain a comparison at 300, 240 and 15,000. I did go off program at 240 for a max speed run, because, well, I had to know. Temps were ISA +10 and we were about 8,500 lbs. TAS nudged right up to 290 which while exciting, was less than the tables called for. In all fairness, my fuselage has more parasitic drag than most with an HF antenna and some extra other antennas sticking out. Looks like my plane probably won’t make NGX speeds but others might!

Icing performance: we did not encounter icing conditions however, on my plane, opening the inertial separator with the stock cowl results in a 2.6 psi torque reduction. Opening the sep with the Speed Cowl results in a 1.6 psi reduction. I can only infer that climb and cruise performance will be improved by 1 psi of torque in icing conditions.

One interesting phenomenon I noticed is a change in harmonics due to the increased airflow. We did a relatively rapid descent from 300 to 240 on both flights and I noticed an increase in harmonics with the Speed Cowl. It is not annoying, just different. Likely related to an increase in airflow I assume. All in all, I’m very pleased with the performance gains.”

– Brian C. flying N326V

Before

Standard Factory Pilatus Cowling

Pressure from high-velocity ram air is reduced by turbulence caused by the shank of the propeller near the spinner. Also, the spinner directs much of the airflow to the lower lip of the inlet causing additional turbulence within the ducting. The result is a significant reduction in ram air recovery to the engine plenum.

After

Speed Cowl For Pilatus

Pressure from the high-velocity ram air is fully recovered at the cowl inlet and flow efficiently through the ducting to the engine plenum. This significantly increases ram air recovery to the engine plenum.

 

 

Contact us today to schedule your Speed Cowl installation

Contact us

How can we help you?

Contact us

How can we help you?

Contact us

How can we help you?

Contact us

How can we help you?

Contact us

How can we help you?

Contact us

How can we help you?

Contact us

How can we help you?

    Technical Services Staff

  • See Bio

    Will D. Cutter

    Regional Maintenance Sales Manager
    X
    Will D. Cutter
    Regional Maintenance Sales Manager
    Email

    Will D. Cutter is the Regional Maintenance Sales Manager for Cutter Aviation Addison and San Antonio, TX locations. He is the dedicated point of contact for client ownership experience and is in charge of expediting post-sale maintenance to include managing and coordinating action plans with approved service centers.

    Will brings a valuable mix of industry knowledge to this role, particularly in the area of piston and turboprop products. Prior to joining Cutter Aviation, Will worked for Piper Aircraft, Inc. as a Marketing Analyst in their Digital Marketing division. Will gained in-depth understanding of Piper’s competitive advantages, target markets and client base while developing a new Customer Relationship Management system. Will also supported Piper’s marketing efforts through website curation and advertisement creation. Life-long exposure to the aviation industry coupled with his previous experience makes Will a remarkable addition to the Cutter Aviation team.

    Will is an FAA rated private pilot, currently pursuing his Instrument Rating and is looking forward to being certified to fly every aircraft Cutter Aviation sells. As a graduate of The University of Arizona, Will received a Bachelor of Science Degree with a concentration in Economics.

    Email
  • See Bio

    James Fisher

    Engine Program Sales and Client Relationship Manager
    X
    James Fisher
    Engine Program Sales and Client Relationship Manager
    Email

    James Fisher is the Engine Program Sales and Client Relationship Manager for Cutter Aviation. James brings with him 25 years of solid aviation experience. Fisher began his career as an A&P mechanic and has held management positions with increasing responsibilities throughout the Aviation Industry. He held several positions in his 15 years at Pratt & Whitney Canada as an Engine Line Manager, Materials Manager, Operation Manager, and Continuous Improvement Manager for ACE (Achieving Competitive Excellence). In his last position as Director of Maintenance for N1 LLC his duties included setting up a heavy maintenance shop for the Honeywell HTF 7000, developing a Mobile Repair Team (MRT), implementing logistics, and managing the Fleet Maintenance Program for all Flexjet Aircraft in Arizona. He was also responsible for managing the operations of the repair station in West Virginia.

    James enjoys his leisure time watching or playing sports, specifically baseball.

    Email
  • See Bio

    Adam Parish

    Manager of Aircraft Services, PHX
    X
    Adam Parish
    Manager of Aircraft Services, PHX
    Email

    Adam Parish is the Manager of Aircraft Services at Cutter Aviation Phoenix Sky Harbor. With over twenty-six years of accomplishments in avionics and maintenance sales, management, business development, STC development, avionics/maintenance installations and repair, he is an asset to the avionics team. Adam joined Cutter Aviation in 2003 with a position in Avionics Sales, and was eventually promoted to Avionics Sales Manager. He left the company in 2008 to pursue other opportunities and returned to Cutter Aviation in 2017.

    Previously, Adam was a Project Manager at Executive Aircraft Maintenance and a Director of Sales at Crownair Companies. He began his aviation career as an avionics and maintenance technician in the United States Air Force, working on heavy military refueling and transport aircraft as well as search and rescue helicopters.

    Email
  • See Bio

    Bruce Tanis

    Manager of Aircraft Services, SAT
    X
    Bruce Tanis
    Manager of Aircraft Services, SAT
    Email

    Bruce Tanis as Manager of Aircraft Services for Cutter Aviation in San Antonio, TX. Bruce is responsible for managing all aspects of the maintenance operation including cost-effective utilization of department resources to meet or exceed service, avionics and aircraft upgrade requirements requested from Cutter Aviation’s maintenance customers.

    Bruce was raised around aviation and is the son of Peter Tanis, the inventor of the Tanis Engine Preheater. Growing up, Bruce’s family owned several FBOs and maintenance facilities where as soon as he was able to see over the engine cowling, he was helping in the shop.

    While attending school at Northwestern Bible College, Bruce worked as a line technician at Anoka County Blaine Airport. He later received an associate’s degree in Aviation Maintenance from Lake Area Technical College in South Dakota. After receiving his A&P License and becoming an IA, Bruce went on to work for several prestigious aviation companies which provided him with unparalleled experience in a wide array of airframes including Piper, King Air, Beechcraft, Honda, Hawker, TBM, Quest and Cessna aircraft as well as commercial airliners.

    Bruce has a Private Pilot License with SEL and MEL ratings. He is married and has two adult sons, who also followed in his family’s aviation path. When not working, he enjoys golf, playing music and most of all spending time with his grandkids.

    Email
  • See Bio

    Christopher Gradisar

    Manager of Aircraft Services, ADS
    X
    Christopher Gradisar
    Manager of Aircraft Services, ADS
    Email

    Christopher Gradisar is Cutter Aviation’s Manager of Aircraft Services in Addison, Texas. Mr. Gradisar is responsible for managing all aspects of the maintenance operation including the successful implementation of maintenance work order projects and cost-effective utilization of department resources to meet or exceed the service, avionics, and aircraft upgrade requirements requested from Cutter Aviation’s maintenance customers.

    Mr. Gradisar began his career with Cutter Aviation in 2005 when he was hired as Chief Inspector for Cutter’s maintenance facility at Dallas Executive Airport. In 2012 Christopher accepted the position as Service Supervisor where he directed the day-to-day operations for the shop. He started his aviation career working as an A&P for an aircraft maintenance provider in Pueblo, CO and later moved to Dallas, TX and worked as a floor inspector with Raytheon Aircraft.

    Christopher enjoys working on home improvement projects in his spare time as well as sailing and racing his MacGregor 26S sailboat. Mr. Gradisar also enjoys spending time with his two grown children and 15-month-old granddaughter.

    Email
  • See Bio

    Kevin Fenske

    Manager of Aircraft Services, APA
    X
    Kevin Fenske
    Manager of Aircraft Services, APA
    Email

    Kevin Fenske is the Manager of Aircraft Service at Cutter Aviation Denver. Kevin found his passion for aviation at a very young age. As a boy, he could be found watching the airplanes flying over his childhood home, playing with toy planes and building aircraft models.

    When he was 15, he got his very first job in aviation, washing airplanes at a small, local airport. After high school, Kevin attended Blackhawk Technical College and received his A&P Certification while working at Wisconsin Aviation, where he stayed for a total of 25 years with different positions, such as lineman for five years, then as an A&P Mechanic, Lead Technician, Inspector, and finally Aircraft Maintenance Manager of the same facility that he washed his first plane.

    Kevin has always been dedicated to learning and furthering his knowledge, experience and expertise. In 2001, he and his wife decided to relocate to Northern Wisconsin to gain more experience with the TBM 700, a plane that he had yet to work on. Kevin worked as a Maintenance Manager for Rice Lake Air Center in Cameron, WI, for 3 years. He threw himself into learning everything he could about the TBM world.
In 2004, Kevin decided to move back to Watertown. He returned to his aviation family at Wisconsin Aviation. He brought with him the vast knowledge he had learned about the TBM and with it, more business for the company. Over the next 11 years, Kevin helped the company grow by facilitating training for his team, increasing shop productivity by 40%, and building strong relationships with customers and vendors.

    In 2016, Kevin and his family moved to Colorado and again, he stepped out of his comfort zone and was excited to take a job where he could learn about Pilatus aircraft. He quickly moved up from Lead Tech to Customer Service Manager to Maintenance Manager. He helped grow the company in a very short amount of time and developed strong relationships with his team, his customers and the Pilatus Network.

    In his free time, Kevin enjoys spending time with his wife and five kids. Learning to golf, and prepping for annual Elk hunts.

    Email
  • See Bio

    Kris Brune

    Pilatus Technical Services Advisor TX
    X
    Kris Brune
    Pilatus Technical Services Advisor TX
    Email

    Kris Brune is the Pilatus Technical Services Advisor for the state of Texas. In this role, he oversees work order implementation and customer support for Pilatus clients at Cutter Aviation’s FAA Part 145 Repair Station in Addison, Texas.

    Kris was born into an aviation-oriented family, where both his father and grandfather served in the US Navy, had their pilot’s license and owned several single-engine and twin-engine aircraft. Growing up with the love of aviation in the family, Kris knew he was destined to be in the aviation industry and wanted to be around aircraft for the rest of his life.

    Kris’ first job in aviation started out at Fort Worth Meacham Airport where during his high school summer vacations, he would be in charge of cleaning two Hawker 800’s and a Jet Stream. At that point, he knew he wanted to get more hands-on with the aircraft and help mechanics with general maintenance tasks.

    After graduating from high school Kris started working for Jet Works Aviation where he became a maintenance assistant. This job experience helped him realize the importance of getting his Airframe and Powerplant licenses, so he enrolled at Tarrant County College and attended classes at night while working during the day. After completing his certification, Kris became a full-time Aircraft Technician and Crew Chief a year after.

    In 2003 Jet Works became Jet Work Air Center and Kris took on new responsibilities as Program Manager for the Pilatus and Piaggio Maintenance Programs. 2013 Jet Works Air center was acquired by Greenpoint Aerospace and he was appointed as Program Supervisor.

    Having a love for aviation from an early age, and always looking for the best opportunities, Kris joined the Cutter Aviation team in August 2018.

    Email